Waterford County Museum, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford, Ireland. Charity Reg: 17397
Tel: +353 (0)58 45960 Email: info@waterfordmuseum.ie
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Stories from Old Newspapers


Flag of Ireland  26 March 1870

Arrest on Suspicion

Our Dungarvan Correspondent writes to us that on Friday evening Acting Constable John Linnehan and Sub-Constable Thomas Wilson, of the Dungarvan Police Station, arrested in the public streets of that town a young man named Michael Crotty, who resides about two miles from Dungarvan.  On his person were found two canisters of gunpowder, a part of a blasting fuse, a drill book, a book of seditious songs, and a small catholic prayer book.

He was brought before the magistrates at petty sessions on Saturday, and information sworn by the two policemen.  He was committed for trial at the next quarter sessions, in default of finding bail, himself in £40, and the sureties in £20 each.

Photo of the Week


Can you identify any of the members of Dungarvan Pipe Band in this photo from 1974?  If so, please let us know.

Photo of the Week



Can you identify the children and place in this photograph?  If so please let us know.

"Imagine" by Jim Cullinane



Pictured left to right: Chrissy Knight, Waterford County Museum & Gallows Hill group co-ordinator, Jim Cullinane, Eddie Cantwell, Waterford County Museum & Gallows Hill Co-ordinator, William Fraher, Curator Waterford County Museum, Dungarvan. (Photo by Paulus).

Gallows Hill Community Group was delighted to receive a donation of a quantity of Jim Cullinane’s most recent work ‘Imagine.’  This is a nice neat presentation and opens a door - if just a little bit – into the thoughts and beliefs of Jim as he takes us on a spiritual journey.

It is on sale at the Museum for a mere snatch.  In reference to ‘Imagine’, Jim reveals that ‘Finally, I’ve arrived at a place where I’m comfortable with the concept of God, not as something or someone in human form but a force, a source that touches all life – maybe not unlike a gentle breeze that sweeps across the planet touching all in its path, and if we allow, in good and empowering ways.  I believe also that this is an on-going process and that this physical life is but a tiny, teeny part of our journey. Our soul is immortal; the physical body will meteorite and die, but the soul journeys on.  My life has been a slow, slow process of understanding and accepting the uniqueness of each and every life, the potential that each and every one carries with us, the importance of being positive especially in our thoughts, which translate into reality and the life we live, the importance of love and forgiveness to ourselves and others, and the absolute importance of connecting with God.  This God force is always ready, willing, and more than able to answer our prayers’.

Jim’s book may look like a religious journey by the author, but it is more than this.  He takes us on a spiritual journey within the pages of his book, as he himself says, ‘there are many ways to God, and being involved and participating in church activities is but one of a multitude.’

Jim’s short stories have been published in the New Orleans Review, Toronto Irish news, and others.  His plays have been staged both In Dungarvan and New York.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Empire State College and a Master of Arts degree in Creative Writing from Manhattan College.  He lives In Mount Kisko, New York with his wife Anne, neé Tyrell and they have four children.  Both Jim and Anne are originally from Abbeyside.

Jim’s book is certainly well worth a read and can be purchased at the Museum on Friary Street Dungarvan. But I warn you be quick!  Our phone number if you wish to order a copy is (058) 45960.

Stories from Old Newspapers








Waterford Standard 15 September 1888

Helvick Regatta

Mr. Villiers-Stuart, Dromana, gave a regatta at Helvick, on Wednesday last, his birthday.  All the tenantry attended.  Mr. Stuart’s sons arranged the programme for the several events.  An address of welcome written in Irish was read by one of the pupils of the Mweelahorna National School and replied to by Mr. Stuart. The children were entertained most hospitably.  Mr Stuart subscribed £2.2.0 to the Cunnigar Races, which came off on the same day.  The drive to Helvick from Dungarvan was a most enjoyable one, and to those who came in Mr. Greene’s yacht Vesper, by sea, a delightful trip was afforded.  Mr. Stuart deserves the best thanks of all, not only for the kindness and consideration which prompted him to promote such amusements, but also for the friendly relations which exist between himself and the tenantry on the Dromana estate.

Busy summer in the Museum









This summer has been extremely busy in the Museum with visitors from all parts of the world.  We have welcomed families from all parts of Ireland and abroad.  We have also been visited by several groups of Spanish students over the last few weeks.  They all enjoyed our exhibits and left lovely comments in our visitor’s book.



          




A Canadian visitor said: “Captivating – Thanks”

A visitor from Cork left the comment: “Fantastic and free!”

Another comment from a Dubliner: “Amazing displays of great artefacts”

Finally, a person from London wrote “very informative, staff very helpful”.


The Museum is open from 10 – 5 each day - Monday to Friday and we look forward to welcoming many more visitors over the coming months.
                                               

Stories from Old Newspapers


Cork Examiner 17 November 1903

Football - Co Waterford Championship

The final tie for the Championship of the Co Waterford was played at Dungarvan on Sunday, the competing teams being Lismore and Clashmore.  A special train was run from Lismore for the occasion, the Clashmore men travelling by car and bringing with them a large crowd. About four hundred travelled from Lismore, and during the performances of both teams the greatest interest was envinced in the match…an immense concourse of people lined the enclosure.  Clashmore won the toss and played with the slight breeze and sun in their favour.  The men were dressed in splendid costumes, which, it should be mentioned, were all of Irish manufacture, and were supplied by the Dungarvan Gaelic outfit establishment.  Mr. Daniel Fraher, an old Gael, was, as usual looking after the arrangements, and those invested with the preservation of order performed their duty satisfactorily.  For the first few minutes Lismore had the best of matters, and kept their opponents on the defensive. Clashmore being able to do nothing more than defend their position…the play being very fast, and after a scuffle Lismore was awarded a free kick from forty yards of goal but failed to score.  Lismore…after some fine play scored a point, thus makings matters even.  At this point a row occurred at the side of the field and the spectators rushing across the field stopped play for five minutes.  Lismore came out the champions of the Co Waterford, the score standing: Lismore 1 goal, 1 point, and Clashmore 1 point.  

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